Colors: Orange Color

The notion of a rug or carpet being quintessential—which is to say definitively indicative of the singular aesthetic of its maker— is certainly nothing new. In fact, it is quite time honored and traditional. Kerman, Kashan, Heriz, and Tabriz—to name but a few—are iconic and easily recognized examples of names that came to define aesthetics inherent to a specific place and indeed time. Then of course there are renowned makers such as Hadji Jalili whose work still inspires replicas, just as there are now innumerable Heriz, et alia, made in disparate lands and of varying quality. The quintessence of these latter versions being indicative of what they are, not what they purport to be.

Exclusive and unique, Samad’s Nirvana collection elevates the aesthetics of machine-made rugs to heights nearing that of some hand-knotted. Rug Insider finds out more.

On first glance the carpets of Samad’s Nirvana collection do not appear to be machine-made in construction—even to experienced rug and carpet professionals. Possessing a soft hand, a comparatively supple handle, and aesthetics comparable to many of the hand-knotted rugs and carpets which currently resonate with consumers, the Nirvana carpets strike a compelling balance between form, function, and price.

What an incredibly strange world we live in currently. While it is true that among public health officials and epidemiologists the dangers of a pandemic have long been feared, who amongst the general population might have predicted one year ago that getting a haircut wouldn’t be possible?

Leveraging technology to reduce waste.

The use of rug samples has become a staple of rug and carpet showrooms the world over. They’re consumer friendly but horribly inefficient in terms of resource use. They also produce excessive waste, all the while making no-one money. “The Showroom of the Future” offers one possible solution.

It began as a novelty to encourage creativity during a spring interrupted by a pandemic. Created by RUG INSIDER Editor Michael Christie, the concept of #tableauxdepompoms is simple: recreate a commonplace scene from around the home or (home) office using color-matching poms—preferably with a timely, perhaps socio-economic message attached. That was the concept. For brilliant execution however, one need look no further than the “Bread and Roses” tableaux created by Catherine Bertulli in collaboration with photographer Dennis Geller.

Diverse influences define  “Luxury Lodge”

Conceived at the forefront of the Luxury Lodge aesthetic, the Mesa Collection from New Moon Rugs serves as a quintessential example of adapting native forms to suit to the needs of contemporary interiors. As the collection enters its third decade, Rug Insider talks with firm founder John Kurtz and current firm principal Erika Kurtz to find out what has kept the collection at the ever-shifting vanguard.

Tamarian is a well-known name among those who frequent markets in Atlanta and High Point, and has likewise been a fixture at events such as The Rug Show for decades. For those who purchase rugs and carpets at retail however, the name may be unknown. Rug Insider takes a look at the firm and its staff as they embark on a new journey of creativity (and branding) under the guidance of firm Principal, and now sole owner, Ryan Higgins.

Treading softly between the ‘80s and the ‘20s

The hand-knotted rug and carpet trade is no stranger to the phrase “One of a Kind,” nor is it an industry short on personalities aptly described by the term. A new house collection debuting at Oscar Isberian Rugs in Chicago, Illinois, merges discrete and distinct personalities and a design aesthetic spanning literal decades; Rug Insider has the first look at this era-spanning one-of-a-kind collection.